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The Last Night From Charlotte Gray Essay

... LastNight The next day, I am almost afraid. Love? It was more like dragonflies in the sun, 100 degrees at noon, the ends of their abdomens stuck together, I close my eyes when I remember. I hardly knew myself, like something twisting and twisting out of a chrysalis, enormous, without language, all head, all shut eyes, and the humming like madness, the way they writhe away, and do not leave, back, back, away, back. Did I know you? No kiss, no tenderness–more like killing, death-grip holding to life, genitals like violent hands clasped tight barely moving, more like being closed in a great jaw and eaten, and the screaming I groan to remember it, and when we started to die, then I refuse to remember, the way a drunkard forgets. After, you held my hands extremely hard as my body moved in shudders like the ferry when its axle is loosed past engagement, you kept me sealed exactly against you, our hairlines wet as the arc of a gateway after a cloudburst, you secured me in your arms till I slept– that was love, and we woke in the morning clasped, fragrant, buoyant, that was the morning after love. Claim: The poem is about a person who fell in love. They were surprised by this, because it was a whirlwind romance and unexpected. The author is surprised by the love and also a little afraid by it. The writer uses metaphors and analysis to set out the scene. There is a sexual theme throughout the...

The Last Night" is an extract, written by Sebastian Faulks, from the story "Charlotte Gray" and is based in the 1940s during World War II, when the Nazis led by Hitler discriminated the Jews by killing them in concentration camps or by enslaving them. These facts are shown during the opening statement setting up the readers' expectations. The title is foreboding of the events in this extract. The writer displays the innocence of refugee children by showing their unawareness of the situation and the fact that they are in such harsh circumstances at such tender age. This causes immense pain and suffering for parents who have the experience of parting. The Jewish refugees also constantly support each other, especially the children, making the journey a little more pleasant. Also the fact that these children were born in such unforgivable conditions and in such a discriminated religion, evoke sympathy upon the reader. The writer evokes sympathy for the children throughout the extract, who do not seem to be aware of what's happening through the use of juxtaposition and visual imagery. When Faulks tells us about the "children" having the "ability to fall asleep" and "dream in other places" right after he talks about "the adults in the room sat slumped", "wakeful" and "talking in lowered voices", he juxtaposes the understanding of adults to how naïve the children were to the situation. This also gives us a visual setting of the room and how separated the camps were as the adults knowing their fate were mourning and children clueless of their fate were sleeping without any problem. Moreover, this visual imagery carries on when "Jacob's limbs were intertwined with [Andre's] for warmth" giving us a better understanding of the harsh conditions and their brotherly love as Andre is primarily concerned about his brother Jacob. This evokes sympathy and emphasizes their pain. Furthermore, through the use of contrast and word choice, readers' pathos is further evoked by the tender...

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